A world of wonderful

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The offSET Shed House by Irving Smith Jack Architects near Gisborne.

The offSET Shed House by Irving Smith Jack Architects near Gisborne. Image: Patrick Reynolds

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The Regional Terminal at Christchurch Airport by BVN Donovan Hill in association with Jasmax.

The Regional Terminal at Christchurch Airport by BVN Donovan Hill in association with Jasmax. Image: John Gollings

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The Dune House by Fearon Hay Architects at Omaha beach has been named as a finalist in the Villa category.

The Dune House by Fearon Hay Architects at Omaha beach has been named as a finalist in the Villa category. Image: Patrick Reynolds

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The Emerald Bluffs House near Wanaka by RTA Studio.

The Emerald Bluffs House near Wanaka by RTA Studio. Image: Patrick Reynolds

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Te Kaitaka ‘The Cloak’ at Auckland Airport is a finalist in the Display category.

Te Kaitaka ‘The Cloak’ at Auckland Airport is a finalist in the Display category. Image: Supplied

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The ASB North Wharf building in Auckland, designed by BVN Donovan Hill in association with Jasmax.

The ASB North Wharf building in Auckland, designed by BVN Donovan Hill in association with Jasmax. Image: John Gollings

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The Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre by Patterson Associates.

The Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre by Patterson Associates. Image: Supplied

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The Stamp House in Queensland, Australia, hangs over the edge of a lake.

The Stamp House in Queensland, Australia, hangs over the edge of a lake. Image: Supplied

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The Garden House in London, UK, is set within a sunken, modernist courtyard.

The Garden House in London, UK, is set within a sunken, modernist courtyard.

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House for Trees in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, replicates a bundle of pot plants with trees growing on top.

House for Trees in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, replicates a bundle of pot plants with trees growing on top. Image: Supplied

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The world’s largest architectural awards programme will take place at the World Architecture Festival (WAF) in October and we can’t wait to see how things unfold. In the meantime, we’ve scoped out our favourite projects from the awards’ shortlist. 

The seventh annual World Architecture Festival awards has attracted entries from more than 50 countries submitted across 30 categories. 

Seven New Zealand projects feature in the shortlist of more than 250, alongside buildings designed by practices such as Zaha Hadid Architects, OMA, Foster & Partners, BIG and Woods Bagot.

Two Fearon Hay Architects‘ projects have been named as a finalists: one of Urbis‘ favourite new Auckland buildings, Te Kaitaka (The Cloak), is a finalist in the Display category; and the Omaha beach Dune House is a finalist in the Villa category. Also featuring in the Display category is the Christchurch Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre designed by Patterson Associates.

The well-regarded team of BVN Donovan Hill in association with Jasmax has been shortlisted for two projects – The Regional Terminal at Christchurch Airport has been named in the Transport category and the ASB North Wharf building is on the Office category shortlist.

Two more impressive residential projects have been named finalists in the Villa category: the offSET Shed House near Gisborne, designed by Irving Smith Jack Architects and the Emerald Bluffs House near Wanaka by RTA Studio.

Internationally, we adore the Stamp House in Queensland, Australia. The concrete home, designed by Charles Wright Architects, hangs over the edge of a lake. The building is entirely self-sufficient, functioning off solar panels and rainwater.

The Garden House in London, UK, is on our lust-list too. De Matos Ryan designed the two-storeyed Battersea home for a couple and their seven children. Set within a sunken modernist courtyard garden, the outside walls continue inside and doors slide open to reveal an open-plan living and dining room. 

On the other end of the design spectrum, House for Trees in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is a series of five concrete boxes with trees growing on top. Designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects, the two-bedroom home is in one of the most densely populated areas of the city, bringing green space to the urban environment.

Overall category winners will be announced during the festival from 1-4 October in Singapore. A super jury, including editor of Architecture New Zealand magazine Justine Harvey, will also decide the winner of the World Building of the Year. 

To view all shortlisted projects, click here.


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