Sound of silence

Click to enlarge
The Hiroshima chair.

The Hiroshima chair.

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The Hiroshima chair.

The Hiroshima chair.

2 of 4
The Hiroshima chair.

The Hiroshima chair.

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Sound of silence

 

4 of 4

The Hiroshima Chair turned heads when it was first exhibited. Not because this was any clever reinvention, or quirky new style, or brightly coloured but because it was none of those things.

In the pull for publicity and acknowledgement amidst thousands of new designs, tricks, quirks and gimmicks can twinkle and beckon. This chair does none of that. A slight curve to the arms, a subtle tilt in the backrest, softly moulded seat, seamless joints, velvet-sanded finishing. One material. Finished to the highest standard. It is what we’ve been looking for in a time of extravagance, gimmick, cheap mass production. It is the antidote to everything, a design balm of simplicity and craft.

Japanese designer Naoto Fukasawa has created something extraordinary for Maruni. This is a piece that doesn’t clamor for attention, but even those who know nothing about furniture or design will immediately understand there is something special about this chair.

seehosu.com.au


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