Vue de Monde

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Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser.

Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser. Image: Dianna Snape

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Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser.

Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser. Image: Dianna Snape

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Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser.

Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser. Image: Dianna Snape

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Vue de Monde designed by Elenberg Fraser won the Hospitality Design Award at the 2012 Australian Interior Design Awards.

Design statement

Vue de Monde explores the concept of the dining destination, moving beyond the clichés that dominate Australian tourism such as reef, rock and road to connect with the local landscape. The experience is connected with the local river estuary through references in the interior design to hunting, fishing and gazing across black pools of a billabong. The bar features a monolith of locally sourced rough black basalt, polished to a mirror finish. This billabong surface reflects the cloud structure above – an art installation by Michaela Dwyer. Pieces of eccentric furniture create a carnival atmosphere, a terrace is filled with the blackened timber forms of a burnt-off landscape and wet areas offer the ultimate estuarine experience: waterfalls of e-Water. The design, which takes into account environmental sustainability principles, includes Australian timber, fur, veneers and furniture, all custom made by Australian designers. LED lights, low-energy-consumption appliances, a ventilated ceiling, up-cycled cutlery, recycled tiles and effective waste recycling also contribute to environmental sustainability.

Jury comment

A sophisticated abstraction of the Australian landscape is translated into an interior design narrative, delivering a highly original aesthetic. Vue de Monde is a restaurant that delivers a sense of opulence, along with a strong sense of place. An artistic and considered approach to the presentation of individual elements throughout the restaurant provides a rich visual backdrop for the diner. A playful and slightly irreverent approach to the use of materials and finishes provides a humorous twist and connection to the underlying Australian narrative. Considered use of task and mood lighting and subdued use of colour and materials assist in the translation of the outback story into an urban setting. This project is a bold, fresh interpretation of an Australian story that does not look to previous benchmarks or indulge in sentimental references to create a unique dining space.

This project also won the Sustainability Advancement category.


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