Pocket Gems

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The head office for gaming company Pocket Gems looks more like a rumpus room than a corporate building.

The head office for gaming company Pocket Gems looks more like a rumpus room than a corporate building. Image: Bruce Damonte

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The office's 'blue zones' indicate separated working zones for meetings.

The office’s ‘blue zones’ indicate separated working zones for meetings. Image: Bruce Damonte

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One of the many large skylights that flood the area with light.

One of the many large skylights that flood the area with light. Image: Bruce Damonte

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Bold colours are tempered with natural timber.

Bold colours are tempered with natural timber. Image: Bruce Damonte

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The pixelated carpet is both a wink to the industry in which Pocket Gems works, and a functional way to denote work zones.

The pixelated carpet is both a wink to the industry in which Pocket Gems works, and a functional way to denote work zones. Image: Bruce Damonte

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The inviting shared kitchen.

The inviting shared kitchen. Image: Bruce Damonte

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In her series of enviable office spaces, Sharon Stephenson reports on the new space designed for mobile gaming company, Pocket Gems.

You’d expect, wouldn’t you, that if you spent your day creating fun and funky mobile games, the space in which you do so would reflect your design ethos? You’d be right in the case of the space Min|Day, a Bay Area architecture practice, created for mobile gaming company Pocket Gems.

Located in San Francisco’s South of Market district, Pocket Gems leases the top floor of a 1920s’ building that had been subdivided into small office spaces. The brief was to open up the 2,133m2 space to create an open-plan environment that takes advantage of the existing skylights and exposed wooden structure, and incorporates distinct areas for play, relaxation and work.

The finished space, which was completed in 2011, features a roomy kitchen, glass-enclosed meeting rooms and large skylights that flood the area with light. A key feature is the pixilated floor covering that unifies and animates the open space as it transforms: the orange and red hues are used to spotlight the public spaces, while the blues indicate more-private working zones. The same hues are used for feature walls. Unsurprisingly, the pièce de résistance is a lounge complete with gaming consoles, a big-screen television and a pool table.


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