Material world

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Textures throughout the home have been chosen to complement the tactility of the concrete.

Textures throughout the home have been chosen to complement the tactility of the concrete.

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A luscious slab of polished Atlantic stone makes the kitchen island.

A luscious slab of polished Atlantic stone makes the kitchen island.

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Rather than seeking a predetermined pattern, the bathroom tiling becomes enticing due to its randomness. The curvature of a wall separates the basin from the shower area.

Rather than seeking a predetermined pattern, the bathroom tiling becomes enticing due to its randomness. The curvature of a wall separates the basin from the shower area.

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Textures throughout the home have been chosen to complement the tactility of the concrete.

Textures throughout the home have been chosen to complement the tactility of the concrete.

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The Point Chevalier home is designed by Ponting Fitzgerald.

The Point Chevalier home is designed by Ponting Fitzgerald.

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A concrete expert builds a fitting palace for his family.

In a land fascinated with timber homes, Ross Bannan is a bit of a rebel with a cause. The concrete expert (or concreteologist, as he likes to call himself) has, throughout the years, collaborated in some spectacular homes using the material.

A luscious slab of polished Atlantic stone makes the kitchen island.

Now, he has built himself and his family a fitting palace. The Point Chevalier home – designed by Ponting Fitzgerald and which became a subject of the current season of Grand Designs New Zealand – was entirely constructed from in-situ concrete, which lends it a raspy texture and patterning.

Bannan, who fell in love with the material during an internship in Europe, says: “It is all about the durability. I wanted the house to look as good 10 years later as it did when we first built it… it had to be low maintenance and bulletproof!”

Although Bannan highlights the practicalities, the home also boasts poignant moments of aesthetic whim, including its usage of Atlantic stone (the polished slab used in the kitchen island is a highlight), stained cedar to warm up the interiors and dramatic lightwells.

“To me,” says Bannan, “this is land art rather than just a home.”


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